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September 2, 2011

Watch Lidia’s interview with Food Network Canada! 9/1


We caught up with Lidia at All the Best Fine Foods in Toronto last week where she introduced a new line of wines, dry pastas and pasta sauces. Lidia is popular, for certain. Braving the large crowd (many lined up around the block for a chance to meet her), we sat down with Lidia to chat a bit about her products, and of course, what defines the “Italian Experience.”

Watch the interview on Youtube or read the article on Food Network Canada’s site!

September 1, 2011

Celebrating Eataly’s first birthday, 8/31


Buon Compleanno, Eataly!

 

 

September 1, 2011

Lidia’s Italy in America: New England


We’re only a week away from the premier of Lidia’s Italy in America! We’re continuing the countdown with a few fun recipes and behind the scenes photos from Italian American New England.

Lidia’s Italy in America begins to air on September 10th; be sure to check your local television listings to see when Lidia’s show airs in your area!

The accompanying cookbook, filled with more than 175 recipes, will be released October 25th. Don’t miss the discounted presale!

Watch a sneak preview here!

Weekly Recipe

Ippoglosso di Gloucester al Forno
Gloucester Baked Halibut

This delicious baked halibut recipe came from The Gloucester House, presided over by Leo Linquata, with whom we had a lovely lunch on the porch of the restaurant. This fish is simple to make and the recipe can easily be multiplied if you have guests coming.

Get a sneak peek at this Lidia’s Italy in America recipe on Lidia’s website.

 

Spotlight on Providence, RI

Federal Hill is the Italian neighborhood in Providence, and Piazza De Pasquale seems to be the community’s beating heart. Scattered trees and umbrellas shade the outside seating of the cafes and restaurants on the square. There is a bronze fountain gently squirting water, and colorful flowers drape from the pots on the lampposts. One might as well be in a piazza in Napoli; there is gurgling water, people chattering, even an Italian song sung now and then.

- Lidia’s Italy in America

If you visit Providence, be sure to check out: Caffe Dolce Vita, Antonelli Poultry, Constantino’s Venda Ravioli, Constantino’s Ristorante Caffe, and the Scialo Bros. Bakery.

Behind-the-Scenes in New England

Constantino’s in Piazza de Pasquale, Providence

Luigi Charchia serenades Lidia in Piazza de Pasquale

Scialo Brothers Bakery in Providence

A sampling of fresh eggs at Antonelli Poultry

 

August 24, 2011

Watch Lidia on the Today Show, 8/23


If you missed Lidia on the Today show yesterday, watch her make Skillet Gratinate of Zucchini and Chicken here–recipe included!

August 24, 2011

Lidia’s Italy in America: Pittsburgh


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We’re back this week with a look at Pittsburgh, the next stop on our Lidia’s Italy in America tour. Join us as we count down the days until the release of Lidia’s newest series and book!

Stay tuned for upcoming posts featuring New Orleans, New England, and many more.

Lidia’s Italy in America begins to air September 10th, 2011. Check your local television listings for the exact schedule. The accompanying cookbook, filled with more than 175 recipes, will be released October 25th. Be sure to check out the discounted presale.


Watch a sneak preview!


Weekly Recipe

Fettuccine con Sugo di Mafalda (Fettuccini with Mafalda Sauce)

I had this dish at Del’s Bar & Ristorante DelPizzo on Liberty Avenue in Pittsburgh, the local restaurant that caters to the neighborhood crowd. It’s not too far from our restaurant, Lidia’s, on Smallman Street. This velvety combination of tomato and cream sauce is good on any pasta. The day we were there it was offered with shells, but I think it is even better served with fettuccine.

Get a sneak peek at this Lidia’s Italy in America recipe and more on Lidia’s website.


Pittsburgh’s Little Italy

I have gotten to know Pittsburgh pretty well during the past ten years, doing research and then ultimately opening Lidia’s Pittsburgh in 2001. The city of steel (now the city of the Steelers) first attracted Italian immigrants toward the end of the nineteenth century. More than a century later, a welcoming Italian community still thrives near Pennsylvania Avenue and in the Bloomfield area, home to Pittsburgh’s Little Italy.

Places to visit: The Pennsylvania Macaroni Co., the Primante Brothers’ sandwich shops, Del’s Bar & Ristorante DelPizzo, and Merante Gifts.


Behind the Scenes in Pittsburgh

Benvenuto a Pittsburgh's Little Italy!

Benvenuto a Pittsburgh's Little Italy!

A vibrant foodie mural

A vibrant foodie mural

Maria Merante of Merante's Gifts

Maria Merante of Merante's Gifts

Lidia's take on the impressive Primanti Brothers' sandwich

Lidia's take on the famous Primanti Brothers' sandwich

liacover

August 22, 2011

What’s for Dinner, Week of 8/22


Dinner is an important part of every day, but I know busy schedules make it hard for families to find time to sit together at the table. Even if you can only manage one family dinner each week, dedicate an hour or two in the evening to chat in the kitchen and over a healthy, home-cooked meal.

Try cooking and eating What’s for Dinner with your family; every Monday I will suggest a simple menu of balanced, family-friendly recipes that are easy and quick to prepare. Whether you decide to follow the menu, use it as a rough guide, or let it inspire you to design your own dinner, I hope you will make some time to enjoy family over a good meal  .

- Lidia


Try these fun summer recipes this week:

Spiedini alla Romana (Fried Mozzarella Sandwich Skewers)

We made this dish at Ristorante Buonavia in the early 1970′s with white bread. Now I find I like the flavor and texture of wheat bread, and I like it even more if the bread is lightly toasted before you put the sandwiches together. Fun, easy, and a guaranteed crowd-pleaser.

Roasted Eggplant and Tomato Salad

Tomatoes and eggplant are in season this month. Serve this colorful and delicious salad as a first course by itself, with other antipasti, or with grilled foods. You can use this low-fat method of preparing eggplant in other dishes too.

friedmozzarellaskewers

August 19, 2011

Happy 30th, Felidia!


cookies

bass

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lorenzo-grandma-and-julia

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August 18, 2011

Lidia’s Italy in America: Southern California


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In anticipation of Lidia’s return to Public Television and the release of her newest book, we’re writing weekly features on some of the great cities Lidia visits in Lidia’s Italy in America. In addition to sharing a few fun facts, we’ll give you a sneak peek at new recipes and behind-the-scenes photos from each episode.

This week we’re featuring beautiful Southern California, but stay tuned for upcoming posts featuring New Orleans, Pittsburgh, and many more!

Lidia’s Italy in America begins to air September 10th, and the accompanying cookbook, filled with more than 175 recipes, will be released October 25th.

Be sure to check out the discounted presale

and watch a sneak preview!


Weekly Recipe

Carciofi Brasati (Braised Artichokes)

The love Italians have for the artichoke is evident at the table. It is also evident as you visit markets in Italy, when you search through the pickled and canned vegetables in the Italian section of specialty stores in America, and when you consider the endless number of recipes dedicated to this thistle.

Get a sneak peek at this Lidia’ Italy in America recipe on Lidia’s website.


Southern California and its Italian Vegetable Trail

Due to their similar climates, one could call Southern California a second Italy. Missing the products from their home country, Italian immigrants transported seeds and knowledge to their new home in Southern California. They developed what would become one of the largest agricultural communities to grow Italian produce like artichokes, purple asparagus, and red radicchio, just to name a few.

Whether you watch Lidia’s Italy in America or read the cookbook, you’ll travel with Lidia and Tanya from San Clemente to Modesto, where they learn all about the Italian-American families who cultivated the farms that give this part of Southern California its reputation. Check out photos from Lidia’s trip below!

Fun Fact: Did you know that artichokes are one of the oldest foods known to humans? The Greek philosopher and naturalist Theophrastus wrote of them being grown in Sicily in 300 B.C. In the 1920s, it was Italians who turned most of the cornfields in California’s Central Coast into a garden of artichokes. As a result, today we have Castroville, CA, known as the Artichoke Capital of the World. Every May, the Artichoke Festival takes over the town, and visitors are offered field tours and are able to taste artichokes cooked in every method imaginable. There is an antique car show, a show of agro art (three-dimensional artworks made of produce), and also a run and walk through the artichoke fields. It comes as no surprise that California accounts for 99.9 percent of the artichokes grown in the United States!


Behind the Scenes in Southern California


Lidia and the beautiful artichokes at Pezzini Farms

Lidia with the beautiful artichokes at Pezzini Farms


the garlic fields at LJB Farms

At the garlic fields at LJB Farms


Lidia at Andy Boy Farms, exploring the endless fields of broccoli rabe

Wading in the fields of broccoli rabe at Andy Boy Farms with Margaret D’Arrigo


Royal Rose Radicchio

Vibrant Royal Rose Radicchio


lidia-at-ljb-farms-garlic291

Brent and Russ Bonino at LJB Farms



liacover

August 15, 2011

Lidia’s Journal: August Figs


Fresh figs

Allow me to reminisce with you, sharing my childhood years spent with my grandmother Rosa in a courtyard in Busoler full of chickens, ducks and geese. I fed them, chased and gathered their warm eggs to make the best pasta.  I recall feeding and playing with goats and pigs; watching them grow from squealing pink piglets to massive animals, until the dark November ritual of making prosciutto, pancetta, sausage, testina and blood sausage.  Come sit with me in my courtyard under the fig tree on a hot August afternoon.  We’ll be shaded by the trees big leaves and eat its fruit until we’re full and then gather the ripe figs in a basket.  The perfect ones will go to market and courtyard animals will eat those that had already plopped on the floor.  The very ripe ones will be left to dry in the sun and then made into a crown of laurel and figs for the winter.

August was particularly special because of the figs.  We were like birds; we knew which fruit was ripe.  You know a fruit is ripe if a bird has bitten it.  The beauty was living with this simple knowledge.  Fruits are at their best when they are beginning to disintegrate.  When the cells of the fruit begin to burst or break, that is when the fruit is officially ripe, and release all the aromas and all the juices.  It is the optimum moment of a fruit.  Today, for commercial purposes, fruit and vegetables are bred to develop strong cellulose skin or thick cell walls so they can travel and do not bruise or break, but they never reach their full maturity or full fruit flavor.  When you see a fig that has cracks on its outer skin, where it begins to wilt a little bit at the point it is connected to the tree and there is a drop of rosolio we used to call it, or sap, that is perfection, that is the fig at its best.  Even there, in the place of origin, a fig doesn’t last long, about two days once harvested.

Fig trees are easy to climb because the branches start and spread out low.  However, they crack easily so you cannot go towards the edge of the branches.  We often used a hook to pull them down.  As kids we were able to make our way up the tree and eat until we couldn’t eat anymore.  We would itch after being on the fig tree because the leaves would leave a residue, but no one cared.  We went on and on, swinging, ultimately ending up in a fig fight.  The figs whizzed through the air and upon reaching destination, your opponent, you would hear a zoff zoff sound.  I had very long hair, always worn in braids.  Many times I would return home with a head full of fig, my hair plastered to my head.  With my fingers I would try to pull the fig out, but the situation would just get stickier.  Of course I was scolded when I arrived home because my hair needed to be washed.  This was also part of the fun, because in the hot August month, we would wash right under the hose in the courtyard.

Figs were abundant, so our figs wars were not considered a waste.  We would also collect figs and bring them to market.  My grandmother would send me up the trees with a little plastic bucket.  She would then line the bottom of a wooden crate with fig leaves and place the figs in neat, little rows to sell at market. We would also dry figs for the winter.  They would be placed in the sun to dry.  When you were sure they wouldn’t get moldy, we would take some venca, a pliable yet strong bush branch, and thread the figs onto it, placing a bay leaf between each fig.  The herb would give flavor and keep the flies away.  The necklaces of fruit, not only figs but also all different dried fruits, would be left in the cantina to be used as winter fruit, often also to decorate our Christmas tree.

- Lidia

August 15, 2011

What’s for Dinner, Week of 8/15


Dinner is an important part of every day, but I know busy schedules make it hard for families to find time to sit together at the table. Even if you can only manage one family dinner each week, dedicate an hour or two in the evening to chat in the kitchen and over a healthy, home-cooked meal.

Try cooking and eating What’s for Dinner with your family; every Monday I will suggest a simple menu of balanced, family-friendly recipes that are easy and quick to prepare. Whether you decide to follow the menu, use it as a rough guide, or let it inspire you to design your own dinner, I hope you will make some time to enjoy family over a good meal.

lidiaandgrandkids3

Try these recipes this week:

Eggplant and Country Bread Lasagna

Another wonderful way to use bread-something that we always have in abundance in our house, fresh, day-old, and dried-is as an element of many savory dishes. It is used in appetizer gratinate, soups, and salads, and day-old bread is great in desserts. Here bread slices are the base and substance of a summertime vegetable lasagna, in place of pasta. You could multiply this recipe and make this as a big party or picnic dish. It’s wonderful warm or at room temperature as a hearty side dish. To vary, roast the eggplant instead of frying it.

Green Beans Genova Style (Fagiolini alla Genovese)

Here’s a great example of a simple vegetable sauté with brilliant Genovese touch. Anchovies provide salty savor to the green beans, and slivers of garlic and lemon bring additional flavor notes. It’s great as a vegetable side dish anytime.

Food Books and Dvds Tableware

Lidia's Italy in America
Lidia brings viewers on a road trip into the heart of Italian-American cooking.
buy now ›
read more ›

Lidia's Pasta and Sauces
Enjoy Them Now!
buy now ›

Lidia's Stoneware Collection

buy now ›
see all tableware ›


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