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October 31, 2011

Watch Lidia’s 7Live Interview! 10/27


Lidia talks about the US food culture.Watch the interview here!

October 25, 2011

Lidia’s Italy in America


Get the new book!

Lidia’s newest public television series, Lidia’s Italy in America, is airing this fall. The accompanying cookbook was released on October 25th!


Shifting the spotlight from Italy to the United States, Lidia brings viewers on a road trip into the heart of Italian-American cooking. Join Lidia as she crosses the country to talk with fishermen, chefs, farmers, butchers, families, and entrepreneurs to learn more about the rich and diverse development of Italian American culture. This new series explores the enduring role food has played in the creation of the Italian-American identity by celebrating the ways in which Italian immigrants adapted the traditional cuisine of their old homeland to fit the new.


October 24, 2011

What’s for Dinner


 

Roasted Winter Squash

Autumn is in full swing! The squash is transformed when its roasted; it becomes the centerpiece rather than a side dish.

Home-Style Chicken

This easy, delicious dish goes nicely with the roasted squash and rounds the meal out well. Add a simple green salad and you have a well balanced meal!

 

 

October 19, 2011

Grandma’s Words of Wisdom –by Tanya


Advice from my Nonna Erminia

“Experiens magister vitae.”


Nonna always uses this Latin phrase to let us and our five grandkids know that “experience is the teacher of life.”  You learn as you go along and hopefully try not to make the same mistake twice. Know that you should use well the life experiences you have been fortunate enough to gain.      – Tanya

October 18, 2011

Watch Lidia on QVC, 10/14


Lidia talks with David Venable about her brand new cookbook, Lidia’s Italy In America, which includes 175 recipes—and their stories–from all parts of Italian America today.

Watch it!

October 11, 2011

Grandma’s Words of Wisdom –by Tanya


Advice from my Nonna Erminia

“Nessuna cosa è piu grande del cuore di una mamma.”


 

“Nothing is bigger than a mother’s heart.”

Coming from a strong matriarchal family structure this rings particularly true to me.   – Tanya

October 10, 2011

What’s for Dinner


Spaghetti in Tomato Apple Sauce

I know you might do a double take at the name of this recipe, but I assure you it is a simple, delightful rendition of spaghetti in quickly cooked tomato sauce. The unique touch comes from shreds of fresh apple, which lend the sauce a lovely aroma and flavor and feel good in the mouth. When I tasted this for the first time in the Val di Non of Trentino, I wondered, why didn’t I think of this long ago?

Spaghetti is my choice of pasta here, but linguine, ziti, or rigatoni would be just as good.

 

Seared Marinated Breast of Chicken with Shiitake Mushrooms

This earthy dish complements the pasta dish nicely. When shopping, look for dried Shiitake mushrooms, which are preferred by most for their umami flavor that is enhanced by the sun-drying process.

 

Dinner is an important part of every day, but I know busy schedules make it hard for families to find time to sit together at the table. Even if you can only manage one family dinner each week, dedicate an hour or two in the evening to chat in the kitchen and over a healthy, home-cooked meal.
Try cooking and eating What’s for Dinner with your family; every Monday I will suggest a simple menu of balanced, family-friendly recipes that are easy and quick to prepare. Whether you decide to follow the menu, use it as a rough guide, or let it inspire you to design your own dinner, I hope you will make some time to enjoy family over a good meal.
- Lidia
October 6, 2011

Olive Oil 101


Olive oil is a basic element in Lidia’s cooking, as it is in the cuisine of much of the Mediterranean Basin. But what’s “good” olive oil? Here are a few tips to help you when you’re cooking and shopping:

Quality:

  • Extra-virgin olive oil is from the first cold-pressing of olives and has no more than 1% oleic acid. This is wonderful drizzled on soups and pastas. You can also use extra-virgin olive oil to dress your salads. When buying olive oil, look for extra-virgin and cold-pressed on the label; this will ensure quality.
  • Virgin olive oil, also from the first cold-pressing, contains from 1 to 3.3% oleic acid. This doesn’t have the flavor of extra-virgin olive oil, but it’s perfectly fine for cooking purposes. For drizzling, extra-virgin will add more flavor.
  • Olive oil is virgin olive oil with an acidity level higher than 3.3% that has been chemically refined to remove impurities and excess acidity. This oil has had some virgin oil added to it to replace the flavor and color removed during refining. This too can be used for cooking (especially frying), but it’s best to avoid chemically treated foods.
  • Olive pomace oil is the oil extracted from the crushed olives with the help of solvents, which is then blended with virgin olive oil. Lidia rarely uses the pomace oil, but it can be used for frying (though it may give you heavier results).

Flavor:

  • For fish, Lidia loves the light and buttery olive oil from Liguria and the Lago di Garda region.
  • For meat or when grilling, Lidia likes the peppery Tuscan olive oil.
  • For vegetables and soups, Lidia likes the herbal, vegetal olive oil form Southern Italy (Puglia, Calabria, and Sicily).

You can buy olive oil at regular, health food, and gourmet or import markets. Eataly in particular has a wonderful selection of nearly 100 different varieties of olive oil from regions all over Italy.

October 3, 2011

What’s for Dinner


Butternut Squash Gnocchi

While this recipes takes a little longer to  prepare, it is well worth your hard work. This is a delicious and comforting seasonal dish that will go over well with even the pickiest eaters.

Smothered Escarole

Simpler is almost always healthier. This easy dish is packed with nutrients to help you through cold and flu season.

Dinner is an important part of every day, but I know busy schedules make it hard for families to find time to sit together at the table. Even if you can only manage one family dinner each week, dedicate an hour or two in the evening to chat in the kitchen and over a healthy, home-cooked meal.
Try cooking and eating What’s for Dinner with your family; every Monday I will suggest a simple menu of balanced, family-friendly recipes that are easy and quick to prepare. Whether you decide to follow the menu, use it as a rough guide, or let it inspire you to design your own dinner, I hope you will make some time to enjoy family over a good meal.
- Lidia
September 29, 2011

LIDIA’S Pastas and Sauces


Click here to shop!

 

What I do best is prepare freshly cooked Italian meals. However, jarred or canned tomato sauce has always been a part of the Italian culture. In the past and present, families would jar their own tomatoes to capture their sweetness and flavors of summer for the gloomy winter days.

To have a sauce in a jar taste as fresh as the ones I remember from childhood has always been something of a challenge for me. I strongly believe that in order to get the best final product, you should use the freshest, highest quality ingredients possible. The sauces include sweet tomatoes, plenty of fresh basil and extra virgin olive oil. It took me many months and trials to reach a final product that satisfied me. I still taste every new batch produced and believe that these sauces are truly unprecedented. My sauces are all natural, gluten free, and kosher.

 

Lidia’s pasta is made in Italy and is made from only the best wheat, which is milled on the premises. Immediately following the milling process, the wheat is transformed into a rich, and supple dough, and subsequently shaped using bronze dies, and then allowed to dry very slowly. The use of bronze dies creates small ‘nooks and crannies’ on the surface of the pasta which allows for optimum absorption of the sauce. It is a simple, but highly sophisticated, process that brings to the table the freshest possible product.

Try these recipes for LIDIA’S pastas and sauces!
Lidia’s Rigatoni with Roasted Eggplant Sauce and Ricotta Cheese
Lidia’s Spaghetti with Shrimp Marinara

My sauces and pasta can be purchased nationally at your favorite food store, or by visiting us on the web at www.lidiasitaly.com. I hope you enjoy the selection of sauces. They are wonderful on my pasta and can be used to cook a wide range of delicious dishes like chicken, fish and veal.

Buon Appetito,

Lidia Bastianich

Click here to shop for LIDIA’S pastas and sauces online!

Food Books and Dvds Tableware

Lidia's Italy in America
Lidia brings viewers on a road trip into the heart of Italian-American cooking.
buy now ›
read more ›

Lidia's Pasta and Sauces
Enjoy Them Now!
buy now ›

Lidia's Stoneware Collection

buy now ›
see all tableware ›


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